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Heartbroken

Seth Petruzelli and Kimbo Lookalike Winner

A lot of people are rejoicing at the death of EliteXC and I’d like to take this moment to say that those people are idiots. I have more reason to dislike ProElite and EliteXC than any of these cheering fools and yet, at the end of it, I’m sad. I’m disappointed to be losing one of my major clients but I’m sad because my fiancé was foolish enough to work his heart out for this company, believing somehow that working harder, “>producing better work would somehow save it.

I’m sad because of the accountants, the legal assistants, HR, the receptionist, the administrative assistants, the shopkeeper, production staff, and the travel coordinator are out of jobs.

I’m sad because people are celebrating the closure of a promotion that has been producing steadily stronger cards and was about to put on the best showcase of their talent yet with Lawler’s third title defense against Joe Villaseñor, Nick Diaz vs Eddie Alvarez, Hector Lombard, Rafael Feijao, Kaitlin Young, and so many others. No, they were not as good as the UFC but they were solid, entertaining and free cards. And now most of these fighters will find themselves without a big promotion to fight for, especially the women.

It’s a damn shame that it had to end with everyone screaming over StandGate, which tarnishes the good matchmaking work being done by those I knew in the fight operations team who I can say were not apart of the alleged fix. Seth Petruzelli loses out too, he was going to be making more than he’d ever made fighting. Well, I guess he can fall back on making smoothies.

People all over the country, hell, all over the world, are losing their jobs. Many in this country are experiencing the crush of our failing economy (and I keep hearing we are not close to the end of this crisis and not near the bottom at all) — no one should be celebrating anyone losing their livelihood.

The antics of Jared Shaw, I mean, Skala, I mean, $kala, and executives aside, I hope the good name of a few employees behind the scenes are not ruined. I can’t say enough about the people I’ve met there and how they’ve brought me closer to the fighters and made it possible for me to take the photos I take, inspired me to shoot more, take my talent more seriously. Sure, there are some assholes who made mistakes, some nice people who made mistakes, but there are a lot of people who worked extremely hard, including myself, to bring EliteXC to light.

I worked at the very first press conference as a freelance sound recorder behind-the-scenes. Maybe a tell tale sign about the future of ProElite was that in late 2006, I recorded $kala signing Eric Bradley, future burglar. I knew about this company before they named the fight operation, EliteXC.

I’m heartbroken. The faces of employees scrounging for cardboard boxes in the office aren’t the faces of greedy venture capitalists looking to make a quick buck off MMA. I know, it’s already been pointed out to me that the inside view is not the best view — I never said it was and never said it’s right — but it’s my view, and I accept that no one, unless you too worked for a failed MMA company, will understand. Don’t pity me, I’m not asking for anyone’s sympathy, I’m just saying — while it might help the UFC in the short term, the collapse of a business is not good for anyone, especially the fans.

Yesterday, I helped some friends pack up their belongings and clear their cubicles. I asked the lawyer what would happen to my work and his red, contorted face told me it was too soon to ask. We loaded the rest of my boyfriend’s belongings including a lamp, his coffee mugs, and collected credentials and fight passes into my car. Fight posters remained on the walls, with the fighters in them watching everything disappear.

It’s the end, and it sucks.

Heartbroken.

Seth Petruzelli and Kimbo Lookalike Winner

A lot of people are rejoicing at the death of EliteXC and I’d like to take this moment to say that those people are idiots. I have more reason to dislike ProElite and EliteXC than any of these cheering fools and yet, at the end of it, I’m sad. I’m disappointed to be losing one of my major clients but I’m sad because my fiancé was foolish enough to work his heart out for this company, believing somehow that working harder, “>producing better work would somehow save it.

I’m sad because of the accountants, the legal assistants, HR, the receptionist, the administrative assistants, the shopkeeper, production staff, and the travel coordinator are out of jobs.

I’m sad because people are celebrating the closure of a promotion that has been producing steadily stronger cards and was about to put on the best showcase of their talent yet with Lawler’s third title defense against Joe Villaseñor, Nick Diaz vs Eddie Alvarez, Hector Lombard, Rafael Feijao, Kaitlin Young, and so many others. No, they were not as good as the UFC but they were solid, entertaining and free cards. And now most of these fighters will find themselves without a big promotion to fight for, especially the women.

It’s a damn shame that it had to end with everyone screaming over StandGate, which tarnishes the good matchmaking work being done by those I knew in the fight operations team who I can say were not apart of the alleged fix. Seth Petruzelli loses out too, he was going to be making more than he’d ever made fighting. Well, I guess he can fall back on making smoothies.

People all over the country, hell, all over the world, are losing their jobs. Many in this country are experiencing the crush of our failing economy (and I keep hearing we are not close to the end of this crisis and not near the bottom at all) — no one should be celebrating anyone losing their livelihood.

The antics of Jared Shaw, I mean, Skala, I mean, $kala, and executives aside, I hope the good name of a few employees behind the scenes are not ruined. I can’t say enough about the people I’ve met there and how they’ve brought me closer to the fighters and made it possible for me to take the photos I take, inspired me to shoot more, take my talent more seriously. Sure, there are some assholes who made mistakes, some nice people who made mistakes, but there are a lot of people who worked extremely hard, including myself, to bring EliteXC to light.

I worked at the very first press conference as a freelance sound recorder behind-the-scenes. Maybe a tell tale sign about the future of ProElite was that in late 2006, I recorded $kala signing Eric Bradley, future burglar. I knew about this company before they named the fight operation, EliteXC.

I’m heartbroken. The faces of employees scrounging for cardboard boxes in the office aren’t the faces of greedy venture capitalists looking to make a quick buck off MMA. I know, it’s already been pointed out to me that the inside view is not the best view — I never said it was and never said it’s right — but it’s my view, and I accept that no one, unless you too worked for a failed MMA company, will understand. Don’t pity me, I’m not asking for anyone’s sympathy, I’m just saying — while it might help the UFC in the short term, the collapse of a business is not good for anyone, especially the fans.

Yesterday, I helped some friends pack up their belongings and clear their cubicles. I asked the lawyer what would happen to my work and his red, contorted face told me it was too soon to ask. We loaded the rest of my boyfriend’s belongings including a lamp, his coffee mugs, and collected credentials and fight passes into my car. Fight posters remained on the walls, with the fighters in them watching everything disappear.

It’s the end, and it sucks.

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