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Another view on the Joe Riggs situation

I was pretty flippant about Joe Riggs getting tossed off tonight’s Strikeforce, mainly because in my mind he’s got a really messed up back and probably shouldn’t be fighting. But other people were more upset, and I think Kid Nate hit the nail on the head when he summed up the problem with the CSAC’s decision to bar Riggs:

So you see, if a fighter tells the CSAC about prescription drugs he’s taking, they won’t license him to fight. And they won’t test the fighter so he can prove the drugs aren’t in his system.

Gut decisions and dumb opinions are all well and good for an asshole blogger like me, but is it really reasonable for the CSAC to do this kind of thing? Are they really allowed to stop Riggs from fighting because he takes pain meds but is still going to be able to test clean? Cycling off steroids before being tested is obviously illegal, but is the same standard applied for stuff like percocet?

15 COMMENTS
  • jolan says:

    The problem with the CSAC and drug testing in general is that they can’t ever admit they’re wrong otherwise every fighter who was rightly busted for steroids will come crawling out of the woodwork.

    So conversely, they can’t test someone who they know will be positive in case it comes out negative.

    So they stuff like that this to preserve the illusion that their tests are 100% accurate with 0% false positives and 0% false negatives.

  • jolan says:

    ^So they do stuff like this to preserve the illusion that their tests are 100% accurate with 0% false positives and 0% false negatives.

  • D. Capitated says:

    I’m confused here. They have to prove that a fighter is using a substance the fighter has admitted taking? Last I checked, regulatory bodies like the CSAC were supposed to do things like, you know, prevent crippled people from professionall fighting and putting themselves at risk. That’s why they do all the CT scans and blood work and stuff like that. I guess the argument now is that the CSAC should just let whoever they want fight, damn the consequences? I mean, if Joe went out, got spiked hit wrong and ended up in a wheelchair, they’d take a hell of a lot more flak for than than keeping a guy who’s using opiate based pain killers to operate from fighting.

  • garth says:

    was the reasoning behind keeping him from fighting purely based on the medication, or did the commission give other reasons? i didn’t read any source material.

  • D. Capitated says:

    It was based on the medication. A licensed fighter in the state of California cannot take percocet. If you really need to know why taking pain killers might be an issue in a fight, watch Frye/Shamrock some time and ask Don how his ankle feels these days.

  • Nachtfalter says:

    “Reasonable” and “CSAC” in the same sentence? That doesn’t sound right…

  • fightfan says:

    Motherfucker is probably dopesick like a mofo. Docotors can tell, no matter how hard Riggs tries and hides it.

    He obviously in the past said he has had problems with pain killer addictions. And these addictions are something you never get rid of. Even if he was addicted a couple years ago…..And last week he started taking percs again…..His body QUICKLY becomes dependant on those percocets and therefore the body becomes dopesick without them. It is like the worst case of the flu with weakend muscles, vomitting, the runs, and pains….Simply take some percs and you feel like a new man.

    The doctors could probably tell something was up with a fighter with DOCUMENTED pain killer addiction telling the CSAC he is AGAIN taking “a” or “some” percocets. For someone with an addiciton to them….”a” or “some” percocets means 20 or 30 per.

  • Kid Nate says:

    My objection is this — if a fighter informs the CSAC about his prescriptions they will refuse to license him. And since he isn’t licensed, they refuse to test him so he can’t prove that his system is free of the drug at fight time. They did the same thing to Diaz over the medical marijuana prescription.

  • Moral of the story is dont tell the truth

  • fightfan says:

    Call me anal or cynical, but I think there is an easy way to by all this horseshit…..

    1.) DONT take anything on the “banned” list of medications!!!!!

    2.) If you are going to take a banned drug or something you SHOUDLNT be…..then do your fucking homework!!! Research the half life of the drug or medication that is banned. AND MAKE SURE IT IS OUT OF YOUR SYSTEM WHEN ITS TIME TO TAKE THE PISS TEST.

    3.) Yeah , there is a 3, and most important. SIMPLY, DO NOT TELL THE commission that you have/are going to take something that you shoudnt be

  • D. Capitated says:

    Whether or not someone has a prescription is totally and completely irrelevant to the discussion. Banned substances are banned substances. No one in track and field cares that there are banned substances in things like Sudafed (which is available over the counter) and they won’t feel sorry for you if you as a professional or even amateur athlete decide you’re above taking a look at the banned substances list.

    That Joe Riggs admitted to be using said substances is why they don’t bother testing. For what purpose would testing serve? He just told you he’s doing it. Its like if one demanded a prosecutor went through a full 6-8 month trial for someone that went in with a guilty plea just because he thought it might be fun practice or something.

  • My question is if fighters aren’t allowed to take Percocet at all, or if they’re just not allowed to test positive for Percocet before/after a fight?

    For example, Tim Credeur was using Adderall, which was on the banned list. But the NSAC said so long as he tested clean he’d be allowed to fight. Unfortunately he didn’t, so he didn’t get to fight.

  • D. Capitated says:

    My question is if fighters aren’t allowed to take Percocet at all, or if they’re just not allowed to test positive for Percocet before/after a fight?

    Depends on the state. In the case of Riggs, he probably has to get his license back with California before he can fight because of that whole back injury thing. If there’s any serious doubt that he can’t pass the drug screening, they may not bother. Depends on the CSAC rules. I’m about to leave work, so I don’t really have time to look them up, but anyone else here can.

    For example, Tim Credeur was using Adderall, which was on the banned list. But the NSAC said so long as he tested clean he’d be allowed to fight. Unfortunately he didn’t, so he didn’t get to fight.

    Different state, different rules. Some states don’t even test, after all.

  • garth says:

    d.cap: you forget we’re all very, very lazy people. that’s why we like you looking stuff up.

  • I feel….meh about this

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